Literature is Love

You may say I'm a dreamer, But I'm not the only one

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centuriespast:

Nelson Wounded at Tenerife, 24 July 1797
by Richard Westall
After the Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797, Nelson was stationed off Cadiz and was ordered to take possession of the town and harbour of Santa Cruz in Tenerife, where Spanish treasure ships were reported to be lying. He immediately set sail with three ships of the line, three frigates, and a cutter and was joined by a fourth frigate and a bomb vessel en route. After several failed attempts Nelson decided upon a direct assault on Santa Cruz by night, aiming for the central castle of San Cristobal, where the Spanish general staff were based. Nelson commanded the attack, leading one of six divisions of boats, the other five being commanded by Captains Troubridge, Miller, Hood, Waller and Thompson. At 10.30pm on 24 July, the British seamen and marines met around the ‘Zealous’ where they formed into six divisions and were roped together. With muffled oars they began the two-mile row to the mole. However, the initial boat-landings went wrong when many of them were swept off course and the element of surprise was lost. During his attempt to land Nelson was about to disembark when he was hit just above the right elbow by a musket or similar ball fired as grapeshot, which shattered the bone and joint. The arm was amputated aboard the ‘Theseus’ that night. The attack ground to a halt and the British force that landed at the harbour negotiated a truce with the Spanish Governor under which they returned to their ships. The Spanish also offered hospital facilities for the wounded.
Date painted: 1806
Oil on canvas, 86.3 x 71.1 cm
Collection: National Maritime Museum

centuriespast:

Nelson Wounded at Tenerife, 24 July 1797

by Richard Westall

After the Battle of Cape St Vincent, 14 February 1797, Nelson was stationed off Cadiz and was ordered to take possession of the town and harbour of Santa Cruz in Tenerife, where Spanish treasure ships were reported to be lying. He immediately set sail with three ships of the line, three frigates, and a cutter and was joined by a fourth frigate and a bomb vessel en route. After several failed attempts Nelson decided upon a direct assault on Santa Cruz by night, aiming for the central castle of San Cristobal, where the Spanish general staff were based. Nelson commanded the attack, leading one of six divisions of boats, the other five being commanded by Captains Troubridge, Miller, Hood, Waller and Thompson. At 10.30pm on 24 July, the British seamen and marines met around the ‘Zealous’ where they formed into six divisions and were roped together. With muffled oars they began the two-mile row to the mole. However, the initial boat-landings went wrong when many of them were swept off course and the element of surprise was lost. During his attempt to land Nelson was about to disembark when he was hit just above the right elbow by a musket or similar ball fired as grapeshot, which shattered the bone and joint. The arm was amputated aboard the ‘Theseus’ that night. The attack ground to a halt and the British force that landed at the harbour negotiated a truce with the Spanish Governor under which they returned to their ships. The Spanish also offered hospital facilities for the wounded.

Date painted: 1806

Oil on canvas, 86.3 x 71.1 cm

Collection: National Maritime Museum

134 notes

swanngalleries:

Who doesn’t love a beautiful Alphonse Mucha Art Nouveau poster? Learn about this Flirt poster from 1899, featured in our upcoming auction of Vintage Posters on August 6th, from our catalogue: 
"Mucha reinforces this biscuit advertisement by flawlessly incorporating the brand name and logo into the image. The Lefèvre-Utile name is visible in the wrought iron gate behind the couple, and initialed in the fabric of the woman’s dress; a quarter of an actual biscuit is depicted in the lower left corner. This is the first edition of the poster. In 1900, it was reissued after the company won a grand prize at the World’s Fair in Paris, with the words Grand Prix - Paris 1900 printed to the left of Mucha’s signature. In addition to posters, Mucha also designed packaging for this famous biscuit company.”

swanngalleries:

Who doesn’t love a beautiful Alphonse Mucha Art Nouveau poster? Learn about this Flirt poster from 1899, featured in our upcoming auction of Vintage Posters on August 6th, from our catalogue: 

"Mucha reinforces this biscuit advertisement by flawlessly incorporating the brand name and logo into the image. The Lefèvre-Utile name is visible in the wrought iron gate behind the couple, and initialed in the fabric of the woman’s dress; a quarter of an actual biscuit is depicted in the lower left corner. This is the first edition of the poster. In 1900, it was reissued after the company won a grand prize at the World’s Fair in Paris, with the words Grand Prix - Paris 1900 printed to the left of Mucha’s signature. In addition to posters, Mucha also designed packaging for this famous biscuit company.”

(via twerkinghannibal)